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Death Valley National Park

 

Join us on a guided tour! Visiting Death Valley National Park is an unforgettable experience.

Day Long Tours & Hikes

Day Long Small Group Experiences

Go beyond the guide books and experience the parks through expert eyes. Book a day trip with a world class guide to show the best the parks have to offer to you, your family, or your small group. With your own dedicated guide, your trip can be catered to your exact interests and needs. After all, we’re all about creating good trips for every human.

From $1255 per group

One of the hottest, driest, and lowest places on the planet, exploring Death Valley is a truly otherworldly experience.

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Custom Private Itineraries

Didn’t see what you were looking for? Book a Custom trip for The perfectly planned adventure.

We offer custom itineraries for families, friends, and corporate groups. Whether you want to camp in the backcountry or enjoy day trips while sleeping in comfortable hotels, we can plan the perfect adventure for your group! Explore some of our sample itineraries and contact us so we can plan your dream vacation!

This Region

National Parks

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FAQ’S

Region Overview

California has called to adventurers for generations. It is truly a state of extremes. Home to both the highest and lowest points in the continental US, the ecosystems of California range from enchanting and remote deserts to rugged, snow-covered mountains.

Our trips will take you to some of the most iconic destinations in America as you learn about the fascinating history and ecology of the great frontier.

Death Valley National Park

With nearly 200 natural arches between them, Arches and Canyonlands are a sightseers dream. However, each offers countless rock formations beyond the arch – there are also towering hoodoos, gigantic canyons, and hidden slot canyons to explore.

Death Valley FAQ’s

 

Your Trip Questions Answered!
When is the best time to visit?

The best time to visit Death Valley National Park is typically in the late fall (November to December) and early spring (February to April) when temperatures are milder and more comfortable for outdoor activities. Avoid visiting during the scorching summer months when temperatures can exceed 120°F (49°C).

What will the weather be like?

Death Valley National Park is known for its extreme desert climate, with scorching summers and mild winters. Summer temperatures often surpass 100°F (38°C), while winter temperatures range from 60°F to 70°F (15°C to 21°C) during the day and can drop below freezing at night. Visitors should be prepared for temperature fluctuations year round and bring plenty of water and sun protection.

What highlights might I see?

Death Valley National Park boasts a diverse array of natural wonders, including Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America, towering sand dunes at Mesquite Flat, the colorful Artist’s Palette, and the otherworldly landscape of the Devil’s Golf Course. Highlights may also include hikes through Titus Canyon or Marble Canyon.

Will I see wildlife?

Despite its harsh environment, Death Valley is home to a surprising variety of wildlife, including desert bighorn sheep, coyotes, kit foxes, and numerous bird species. While wildlife encounters are never guaranteed, we might also encounter reptiles such as lizards and snakes, as well as insects adapted to the desert climate.

Should I combine this trip with another National Park?

Enhance your journey by combining it with parks such as Joshua Tree National Park (4-5 hours) or Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (5-6 hours). If you are traveling in the winter or spring, be aware of road conditions in Sequoia and Kings Canyon as these parks experience snowy weather. You can also opt to head east to Las Vegas (2 hours), which can act as a launching pad for a Southwest adventure.

Are there any entry regulations I should know about?

Death Valley National Park does not require vehicle reservations or timed entry.

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